Kindrogan Strathardle Wall Hanging

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Kindrogan House is placed on a bend of the River Ardle. It is imposing, with three gables and ornate doorway. The curtains of the house are made from two William Morris patterned fabrics.

On the river are mallards , a dipper and a pair of goosanders. An otter and her cub sit amongst the rocks.

Spring brings the daffodils to the front lawn, and the red squirrels spend their time digging to hide or retreive their nuts. Two plaid rugs are laid out, with cups and a pot, for Queen Victoria to take tea as she did on the 1st October 1866 on an excursion from Dunkeld to Spittal of Glenshee. The tartans are Robertson Red Ancient and Robertson Hunting Ancient. The crown is a winter one, made of Harris Tweed.

To the left is a wood pile on which pine martens hunt for peanuts. Behind are trees covered in lichen, and in amongst them the shadowy shape of a roe deer.

The walled garden is fronted by two dragon planters. Behind the garden are some of the specimen trees : Wellingtonia, Copper Beech and Oak. Fallow deer graze within the wood.

The summer meadow behind the house is full of sheep and lambs, and a solitary hare. The plantation to the left surrounds the Balfour-Keir family graveyard, which has broom flowering in front. A fallow buck holds his stand in the plantation. A secrative wildcat watches from the cover of the trees.

The fields above the river are cut and turned for silage. The highland cattle graze in the fields near to the remote cottages.

The River Ardle flows past the curling pond, which has frozen and attracts local children.

Up on the higher ground the plantations of trees and the purple heather are the territory of the red deer who are preparing for the Autumn rut. A standing stone is found in the corner of a field.

To the right a couple of trees are now bare of leaves as the first snow of Winter covers high ground. A golden eagle flies majestically above the mountain surveying the life below.

The logos of the Scottish Field Studies Association and Field Studies Council are incorporated as links in the history of Kindrogan House.

The Wall hanging has been made by Liz Lonsdale and took her around 150 hours , it measures 2.5m high and 2m wide and is proudly displayed in our upstairs coffe lounge.

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